FAQ

What is forward rowing?
Forward Rowing is rowing where the rower faces forward – in the direction of travel.
What are the benefits of forward rowing?
  • Increased safety – Increased safety is the greatest benefit of forward rowing. You see what you are approaching – rocks, logs, etc and also see whatever can be rapidly headed in your direction – speedy boats, water skiers, large wakes, etc. You see what is coming so that you can avoid it or be prepared for it.
  • Vastly better wildlife viewing – seeing animals as you approach them so you can stop and watch. With a rearward facing boat the birds, otters, beaver, etc are often gone or in hiding by the time your boat passes by.
  • More years of enjoyment on the water – Rowers no longer have to continually twist or spin to see where they are going. Stiffer necks, backs or shoulders don’t mean rowers have to give up rowing. As we age our ability to twist around lessens and for many rowers this becomes the major factor in saying it is time to give up rowing. By eliminating this constraint, forward rowing allows for more, safe rowing years.
  • More enjoyable rows with friends – When you are out with others you can spend more time communicating with them without fear of losing track of what is approaching you.
  • More enjoyable rows with friends – When you are out with others you can spend more time communicating with them without fear of losing track of what is approaching you.
Is the Gryffyn useable in racing?
This type of forward facing rowing is not presently allowed in racing circles. The Gryffyn is designed for recreational rowing. Get out on the water, check out the wildlife, be with friends, have a good workout.
What boats can I mount the Gryffyn on?
Wherries, kayaks and canoes have been very successfully used with the Gryffyn. There is no universal standard in boat design so each craft has to be set up for its best fit.
What is the difference between the two gearboxes?
Size and strength. The larger rower is for larger boats. It is heavier and the action has less wind-up or wippyness giving more of the feel of a solid (“regular”) oar. Used with a non-sectioned outer oar it approaches the stiffness of a solid oar.
What Oar Types are available?
Oar types include segmented carbon or fine Spruce wood stems.